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Für alle Technologie-Interessierten habe ich hier einen Werbespot für eine neue Forschungsstation, den Sir Patrick moderiert (man beachte die vielen Close-Up Shots, das erinnert einen an die guten alten TNG-Zeiten der ersten beiden Seasons, wo man sein Gesicht noch im Riesenformat vorgesetzt bekam ^^ *g*):

Click me!

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Und wieder ein neues Amt für Sir Patrick! *ggg*

Sir Patrick Stewart OBE Named Huddersfield Town Academy President

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Huddersfield Town is proud to announce that worldwide film, stage and television superstar Sir Patrick Stewart OBE has become President of the Academy.

Stewart is best known for his roles as Jean-Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation and Professor Charles Xavier in the X-Men films and is also Chancellor of the University of Huddersfield; a role in which he presented Club Ambassador Andy Booth with his honorary fellowship recently.

A diehard Town fan, Mirfield-born Patrick – who was recently knighted in the Queen’s New Year’s honours list for his services to drama – will help the Club raise the profile of its youth system.

His role is a new one at the Club and Commercial Director Sean Jarvis explained that the Olivier Award winner can play a vital role in the continued progression of the Academy.

“It is fantastic news that someone with the profile of Sir Patrick Stewart is getting officially involved with the Huddersfield Town Academy. Patrick has terrific passion for the football club and will act as a figurehead for the Academy as it builds for a bigger future.

“Everyone at the Club is honoured that Sir Patrick has accepted the role and we are looking forward to working with him.”

Academy Manager Graham Mitchell echoed Sean’s comments.

“One of the primary objectives of my job is to continue the development and growth of our already successful Academy and having Mr. Stewart on board as President will be a massive tool for us in terms of attracting sponsorship and raising our profile in the local and wider communities.”

Huddersfield Town Chief Executive Nigel Clibbens welcomed Sir Patrick to the Club.

“We are delighted to have Sir Patrick on board with us in an official capacity. He has been kind enough to help out the Club on several occasions already, with our season ticket campaign ahead of the current season for example and with the Yorkshire Air Ambulance ‘Keep It Up’ campaign, and we are looking forward to harnessing his drive and passion for the Club to further the Academy.”

(Quelle)

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So, Mini-News, aber trotzdem interessant irgendwie. ;)

Top actor at Gills game

Star spotters at Priestfield on Saturday picked out actor Sir Patrick Stewart in the crowd.

Sir Patrick, who played Jean Luc Picard in Star Trek: The Next Generation, was watching Huddersfield Town take on the Gills on Saturday.

The actor, who was knighted in the most recent New Year's honours list, was born in Yorkshire and is a lifelong fan of the Terriers.

But even having such an illustrious fan to cheer them on did not bring Huddersfield much luck as they went down 2-0 to the Gills.

Sir Patrick is also believed to have popped into the Livingstone Arms pub for a drink during his time in Gillingham.

(Quelle)

Ein Foto habe ich auch:

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Sir Patrick hat wieder einen Artikel geschrieben:

The academy trek: a transformative journey into a world of potential (Sir Patrick Stewart describes the delights of higher education, the dangers it faces and how Huddersfield lured him home.)

After a long period of my life spent in the US, I began to think of a permanent return to England.

It happened eventually and the result would mark a rewarding new chapter in my acting career. But I needed a special spark to make me relocate again. It came from a university, which may seem unusual in view of my life story.

I suppose my own higher education took place with the Royal Shakespeare Company. After secondary modern schooling in West Yorkshire and a rather chequered and short-lived stint as a cub reporter on a local paper, I managed to break into repertory theatre in the late 1950s.

After seven years I made it to the RSC and stayed with the company for 14 years. It was my life and my passion. The company provided a superb theatrical education, as well as giving me the opportunity to mix with clever, highly educated colleagues and creative people from cultures all around the world.

While in the US, I was co-director of Acter: A Center for Creative Theater, Education and Research, based at the University of California, Santa Barbara, but had little contact with the world of education in the UK. So it came as rather a surprise when, in 2004, I was asked if I would consider becoming chancellor of the University of Huddersfield. The answer was yes, I would be delighted - but I wanted to be rather more than a figurehead who showed up once a year, donned the ceremonial robes and handed out certificates. I wanted to be as closely involved with the university and its development as time would permit.

And it was this prospect that helped me to make up my mind and move back to the UK. I had a career and property in the US, but I wanted to go home. In terms of my artistic development, it would prove to be an excellent move. I believe my experience stands as a metaphor for the transformative power of university education.

My own journey took me back across the Atlantic and towards a new phase in my stage career. At universities such as Huddersfield, students make a journey into their own potential. It is vital, not only for them but for the country as a whole, that as many people as possible take this road.

My involvement with the University of Huddersfield has worked out just as I hoped. I am proud to be thought of as a hands-on chancellor - and to have been appointed professor of performing arts. I am proud of the way that the university, with its deep roots in local industry and technical education, has expanded both in terms of student numbers - they stand at a record 24,000 - and the range of its research.

Huddersfield's campus is an exciting place to be. The range and quality of teaching and research - from science, engineering, health, social work and business to the humanities, music and drama - are a constant inspiration. The students and staff I meet here are making a difference to our future.

But the future of higher education itself is uncertain. It is fortunate that Huddersfield has placed itself on a sound financial footing, but we cannot expect immunity from the effects of government cutbacks.

Every sector of the economy faced with retrenchment will make a case for the impact to be minimised. Universities are no exception. Is it special pleading? I hardly think so. A reversal in the expansion and quality of higher education in the UK would have serious implications for individuals, for organisations, for the future of our country.

At Huddersfield, but at dozens of other universities as well, research is taking place that will create and develop the new technologies, industries and economic activity that we desperately need. The graduates who will nurture and develop those industries are vital for our future prosperity.

I am proud to be involved closely with one of our universities. The UK should be proud of and jealously guard its university sector as a whole.

(Quelle)

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Ich hab mir ne Behind-The-Scenes DVD-Doku namens Theatreland gekauft, die während des gesamten Runs von Waiting For Godot letztes Jahr gedreht wurde. Die Sache ist für jeden Theater-Fan ein Muß - und auch für jeden Sir Patrick Fan, man bekommt ihn live und ungeschminkt und backstage und überhaupt zu sehen. *ggg*

Ich hab auch ein paar Screenshots gemacht, hier ist einer davon:

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Sir Patrick ist gerade bei den Jameson Empire Awards in London:

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Hier findet man ein Video von gestern, auf dem zu sehen ist, wie Sir Patrick und Roger Rees Sir Ian McKellen einen Award überreichen...

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:dumdiedum:

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Der Bart macht was her. Damit könnte er glatt wieder nen Warbird kommandieren.

Ian McKellen erinnert mich da an einen meiner früheren Professoren.

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Haha ja den Bart hat er sich wieder wachsen lassen für seine kommende Rolle als Shakespeare im Stück Bingo. *ggg* Er sieht aber echt nicht schlecht aus damit, das stimmt. Muß ich sagen. In nem Ami-Board meinte jemand "OMG it's Mirror Stewart!" *lol*

Ja Sir Ian sieht wirklich auch putzig aus mit dem zerrupften Bart usw. :laugh: Er führt ja immernoch Waiting For Godot auf soweit ich weiß, da braucht er eben diesen Look. *g*

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Sir Patrick war gestern bei The One, einer BBC-Sendung die ich mir leider dank diesen blöden regionalen Restriktionen nicht ansehen konnte - aber wofür hat man Bekannte in UK, die einem sagen, was war? *ggg* Es war ein guter Auftritt, er sprach über seinen Ritterschlag (siehe unten) und über Huddersfield Town, seinen Lieblingsfußballverein.

Stewart's Shock At Knighthood

British actor SIR PATRICK STEWART would like to relive the moment he learned of his knighthood - and not open the official letter informing him of the high honour in a hotel room on his own.

The 69-year-old thespian was saluted for his 50-year acting career in Queen Elizabeth II's New Year's Honours list at the beginning of 2010 - but he mistakenly took the correspondence on location with him last year (09), while he was shooting MACbeth.

And he forgot about it for four days.

He confesses, "I was on location in North Nottinghamshire. We were filming MACbeth and I'd brought a big envelope from my agent and put it in a closet and left it there for three or four days.

"I was leaving early one morning and thought, 'I've got five minutes', and started going through stuff and there it was. (I was) sitting in this all-brown hotel room at about quarter past six on a November morning when I saw it.

"The frustrating thing was we were shooting a big scene that day with most of the cast and what I wanted to do was rush on the set and go, 'Guys, you'll never believe what has happened!' but of course I couldn't."

The former Star Trek captain insists the new title hasn't gone to his head: "I do not insist on it, not at all - but if you care to (use it) I won't protest. I'm delighted and thrilled and never thought something like this would happen to me."

(Source)

Und hier noch ein Gerücht. Bisher ist es noch NICHT bestätigt worden, also Vorsicht.

Acclaimed Tony Award nominated actor Sir Patrick Stewart will return to Broadway in David Mamet's 'A Life in the Theatre'. Stewart will portray the lead character of 'Robert', a role he previously played in the 2005 production at London's Apollo Theatre. 'A Life in the Theatre' will be directed by Neil Pepe. Additional cast will be announced at a later date.

(Source)

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Sehe gerade "Lady Jane - Königin für 9 Tage" auf Sky Emotion - irgendwie interessant, Sir Patrick Stewart in einer totalen Unsympathen-Rolle zu erleben. <_<

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Eigentlich hat er in seiner Film-Karriere mehr Bösewichte als Gute gespielt. *ggg* Oder auch welche, bei denen mans nicht genau weiß, wie eben auch bei Lady Jane. Ich mag das Ende eigentlich, wenn er "I owe it to my daughter!" ruft und mit seinem Pferdchen losreitet obwohl er weiß daß es nutzlos ist. Aber ansonsten ist Lady Janes Vater eigentlich ein Ekel, das stimmt schon. Aber der Hausrock steht ihm wenigstens gut...

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Unglaublich - Du kennst wirklich Alle Filme, in denen Sir Patrick mitspielt!! Du hast Recht - der Schluss war gar nicht so schlecht.

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Ja ich bemühe mich, sie alle zu kennen. *ggg* (Ich sag mir immer ich wär ein mieser Riesen-Fan wenn ich sie NICHT kennen würde.)

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Hier findet man unter PHOTOS/REHEARSAL Fotos von Sir Patrick während der Proben für sein neues Stück BINGO. :)

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Ein neues langes Interview!

Patrick Stewart can't wait for Chichester role

Some would have us believe the world begins and ends in Hollywood, but don't try telling Patrick Stewart that.

'The past five or six years since I returned to the UK have been the best of my life,' he says. 'When I made the decision to try to revive my classical stage career here, I never allowed myself to expect it would turn out as well as it has.

'It has been both challenging and totally rewarding. It has been all I ever wanted to do since I was 14 – to be on stage doing great plays with great actors and directors in wonderful theatres.'

He is now approaching 70 and is returning to Chichester as Sir Patrick, having been knighted in the New Year Honours for services to drama. But he is relaxed about whether we call him Sir Patrick or just plain Patrick.

'I'm still a little bit dazzled by the whole experience,' he says, 'but delighted. And I'm very much looking forward to the ceremony in June.'

That will be just after he has appeared as William Shakespeare in Edward Bond's play, Bingo, in the Minerva Theatre. He has established himself at the forefront of his profession since returning home to do those great plays with great actors.

'England is the best place to do that if you are an English-speaking actor, and to find a sequence of productions – five Shakespeares, an Ibsen and a Beckett (Waiting For Godot with Sir Ian McKellen) – this is the kind of experience I always longed to have. I had come to realise I wasn't going to get that in Hollywood, despite the success and excitement of all my work there.'

He admits his fame in Star Trek (as Jean-Luc Picard) and in X-Men gave him a higher public profile, but says it also became an albatross. 'One distinguished Hollywood director I wanted to work for said to me "Why would I want Captain Picard in my movie?" That was painful. I'm not saying that's all over. On the contrary, next year I hope to be active in film again. But I'm hoping in a way to go in through the back door rather than wearing the Star Trek spacesuit.'

And for now he is more than happy to be back on stage in Chichester, where in 2007 he played not only the title role in a multi-award-winning modern-dress Macbeth but Malvolio in Twelfth Night.

Patrick speaks in the rich though not fruity tones of the classical actor, but he grew up in working-class West Yorkshire, dropped out of school with no qualifications and began his working career at 15 as a reporter on his local newspaper.

But his heart was so little in it that he invented stories, he says.

Den Rest des Interviews gibts hier.

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Und schon wieder ein Interview. ^^

INTERVIEW: Patrick Stewart returns to the Chichester Festival Theatre

Patrick Stewart is known to millions as Star Trek's Captain Jean Luc Picard and as X-Men's Professor X from his high-profile Hollywood days. But the deepest satisfactions have always been found on the stage, he says. In the past six years, since his return from Los Angeles, Patrick has devotedly pursued his love of Shakespeare in a string of acclaimed productions, not least Macbeth and Twelfth Night three years ago here in Chichester.

Now he's back at the Festival Theatre once again, this time taking his love of Shakespeare to the next level.

This time, he really is playing Shakespeare, the man himself, in Edward Bond's Bingo: Scenes Of Money And Death which opens this year's summer season in the Minerva tonight (April 15-May 22).

It's a project which fills him with pleasure.

Prior to taking command of the Starship Enterprise, Patrick had established himself as one of England's foremost leading actors. He joined the Royal Shakespeare Company in 1966, launching a 26-year association which saw him work with directors Trevor Nunn, Peter Hall and Peter Brook and star in productions including Anthony And Cleopatra, The Merchant Of Venice, Henry IV and Richard III.

And it's to this side of his career that he's now returned.

"I came back to this country because I wanted to see if I could relaunch my career as a classical actor in the UK", he says. "I didn't know if it was possible. I didn't know if I had been away too long, if I would be allowed to jump back into the theatrical community. But I knew I had to give it a shot. While I was busy and successful working in Hollywood, it was never really what I wanted to do."

The opportunities certainly existed in the States including memorable productions of The Tempest and Othello: "I did do some classical work, but I wanted to really immerse myself."

Which is exactly what he's now done – with spectacular success.

So did it feel like he'd ever been away?

"I think that my instincts are more developed now than they were. I did a lot of challenging work in the 17 years that I lived in LA – work in film and TV and stage. But I think one of the things that the experience gave me was confidence, a lot more than I had had before – and that's something that I have been able to bring into the work in the last five or six years."

Den Rest des Interviews findet man hier.

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findet sich ein kurzes Video zum Thema Hamlet.

Uuuuuuuuuuuuund schon wieder ein neues Interview:

Patrick Stewart is reprising the role he has campaigned 20 years to play.

Sir Patrick Stewart nearly flung his knighthood in the bin. The letter came in such a nondescript manila envelope that it sat in a Sainsbury’s bag full of other unopened post at the bottom of a cupboard until, at 6am one morning last November, with nothing better to do before filming Hamlet with David Tennant, he sorted through the contents.

In the envelope, together with a box-ticking questionnaire about gender and ethnicity, he found a letter from the Cabinet Office announcing that he had been awarded a knighthood for “services to drama”. “I was stunned,” he says. “I recall wandering around this brown hotel room in north Nottingham not knowing what to do next. The letter specifically said it was confidential so I couldn’t tell anyone, but what I wanted to do was to rush on set and say: 'You will never believe it!’?”

Discretion, and time difference, also stopped 69-year-old Stewart from calling his girlfriend, thirtysomething jazz singer Sunny Ozell, in New York, or the two children from the first of his two marriages. So he kept mum and, no doubt, inwardly glowed in a slightly unearthly, Star Trekky way. If further endorsement were needed that his decision to leave Hollywood after 17 years and return to Britain in 2004 had been a success, this was it.

Not that it had seemed like a good move initially. “I didn’t get any work for six months,” he says. “I hammered away at the Royal Shakespeare Company, saying: 'Please cast me?” Eventually the call came. Greg Doran wanted him to play the title role in Anthony and Cleopatra, opposite Harriet Walter. But his return to Shakespearean acting had a “calamitous” beginning.

On opening night the fire alarm went off and the theatre was evacuated, leaving Stewart kicking his heels on the Stratford grass wearing Roman costume, alongside the audience and critics. But he kept going, the reviews were good and the rest was… certainly not silence.

Sir Patrick loves to talk and does so in great long rolling sentences, each word beautifully enunciated as if he were addressing a packed house, not chatting over a salad in the café of the Chichester Festival Theatre.

For 20 years he has campaigned to revive the Edward Bond play Bingo, in which he first starred 28 years ago. Finally, when the Chichester programme sprang a gap, artistic director Jonathan Church let him have his way. Once again, he will play William Shakespeare during the last, unproductive and – according to Bond – troubled days of his life.

Den Rest des Interviews findet man hier.

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Patrick Stewart Talks About 'Hamlet,' 'Macbeth' and His IT Guy... Wil Wheaton

Most people know the recently-knighted Patrick Stewart from his movie and TV roles, many of which are of the sci fi / fantasy variety. Of course, there's Jean-Luc Picard of 'Star Trek: The Next Generation,' but there's also Charles Xavier in the 'X-Men' series and the voice of Avery Bullock on 'American Dad.'

But back in his native England, Sir Patrick is just as well known for his Shakespearean work, both on-stage and on the screen. Some of that work will be on display on April 28, when he reprises the role of Claudius (he first played the role on TV 30 years ago) in PBS's production of 'Hamlet' on 'Great Performances.' As Nick mentioned yesterday, the production, with David Tennant in the title role, mixes the classic dialogue with modern dress and settings to give the play a more contemporary feel.

Stewart will also perform in the title role of 'Macbeth' for a similarly-staged production airing on PBS later this year. I sat down with Sir Patrick in January, when he presented at the TCAs; we spoke about the two productions, what his classic training brought to his 'Star Trek' role, his guest turn on 'Extras' and how his first ever IT guy was none other than Wil Wheaton.

What are the difficulties of taking a stage production of a Shakespearean play, putting it on TV, and changing up some of the paradigms, like not having period costumes, or changing the language?

In the case of both of these productions ('Hamlet' and 'Macbeth'), they look as they looked on stage, in terms of their period. I have done both over the past five years. I've been in five Shakespeare productions, major productions. Four of them have been in 20th century dress. One of them, 'Antony and Cleopatra,' was set in period Roman and Egyptian costumes And I wouldn't have had it any other way. Because the costumes were redolent, and everything that was in the play. On the other hand, I love William Shakespeare in (modern) dress because it immediately removes you from that, any slight awkwardness of being in costume and having to deal with, you know... And of knowing that sometimes you look like a painting and not like a human being.

So as an actor, it actually makes you feel more comfortable?

It does, yeah, yeah. I must say it does. And certainly with the 'Hamlet,' I mean, I had a series of beautifully made suits to wear, two of which were my own. The production couldn't afford to make all those suits for me. And then in the 'Macbeth,' where we gave it this sort of certain kind of iron curtain, cold war feeling, some unnamed European country... Although the big guy with the mustache seemed to remind us of someone... It just, I don't know, I find it liberating.

When these plays are adapted, usually into modern dress, what is the motivation usually? Is it to bring the viewer closer to the production?

That, as well as to give the play sometimes quite specific contemporary resonances.

'Macbeth' has definitely a noir-ish feel to it...

(chuckles) You bet!

What was the goal there? Was it to connect the play in the mind of the viewer, with a certain period?

We hoped that the references would spark images, sensations, associations, with contemporary society that would make the play relevant for today, without losing any of its rich, you know, 17th century status.

Are you trying to build a different world, or a different feeling in 'Macbeth' than 'Hamlet?'

Oh very different, yes. In 'Hamlet,' with its black walls reflecting surfaces, doors that open and close where there don't seem to be any doors there, mirrors everywhere, that sense of a society being, at the same time enclosed and observed. So it gives it almost a sort of laboratory feeling.

In a production like this where you're using modern costumes, but you're using the original language, do you think the viewer eases into it and gets used to it? Or do you think it's something that's difficult for viewers to get into, especially if they're not familiar with some of these productions?

Look, it's difficult for me. I go and see a play like 'Cymbeline,' say, or 'Timon of Athens,' or what did I see the other night, 'All's Well That Ends Well,' plays I've never been in, I'm not very familiar with them. Oh yeah, for the first five or ten minutes, I'm struggling, almost breaking out in sweat, concentrating on that language, you know, what's going on. It's hard. And if it's hard for me, who's spent 50 years with this stuff in my mouth, what is it like for somebody (clicks) who says 'Let's see what's on tonight' and turns on the television? So we are, all of us, hyper-sensitive to making it accessible.

David Tennant and Patrick Stewart in 'Hamlet' on CBSWhen you were working together, did you and David Tennant -- because of your 'Star Trek' history and his 'Doctor Who' history -- trade any sci fi convention stories or anything like that? Or talk about sci fi fans?

No, not really. We talked a lot about, 'How do you approach work like that?' David had been a Shakespearean actor before 'Doctor Who,' as I'd been. How do you deal with this, in his case -- well I guess it's science fiction, it's not fantasy is it? -- 'Doctor Who?' What do you bring to it? What in our work proved to be helpful to doing these other things? Where did the performance become released, based on previous experiences?

In your case, what did all your Shakespearean experience bring to playing a role like Jean-Luc Picard all those years, in a genre that's so different from what you had been doing?

Well, in a word, is difficult. But I would say it brought gravitas maybe.

Do you think that's what attracted a lot of people to that version of 'Trek?' Because there was more gravitas and more seriousness to it?

Yeah. I hope so. That's what we tried to bring. I mean, we had a lot of fun, too. Of course, fantastic fun. But yeah, we took it seriously. And so if I'm standing there talking to, you know, some alien on the view screen, or an oil slick, which I did once have a conversation with, or a grain of rice that I talked to once, you know, you better take that seriously.

Wil Wheaton used to write for our site; he would take the season one episodes of 'Next Generation' and do recaps with his funny spin on them. What's interesting about his recaps is that in the first season everybody was feeling things out, and trying to figure out what was going on. When you look back now, did you think that it would still be such a well-remembered show?

(whispered) Noooo... No. I was told we wouldn't make it through the first season. Everybody I went to ask, 'What should I do, I've been offered this job, what should I do?' A few people I knew in Hollywood, their opinions ranged from, 'You'll be lucky to do all 26 episodes,' through to 'Eh, a couple years maximum.' Nobody... nobody... banked on it.

Do you think it's interesting that Wil's now this geek icon now?

He always was. He set up my first computer. The then-head of Apple, Jean-Louis Gassée (was a) big 'Star Trek' fan. And one day, all these boxes arrived. I didn't have a computer, (just) an electric typewriter. All these boxes arrived and Wil saw them there. And I don't know, somewhere said (high pitched and excited) 'Wow! Man! You've got all this cool stuff!' I mean, literally, that was the dialogue. And he said, 'You gotta let me set it up!' So he came around with another friend of ours during the production, and he set up my first computer.

Then you knew that was a sign of things to come?

Sure. Absolutely. No question of it.

I still remember your guest shot on 'Extras.' When Ricky Gervais approached you to do that, what was your impression of it? Did you like skewering your image like that?

Well, I've never been given such an opportunity before. And I'll tell you how it happened. I'm in my market in Bermanzi and my phone rings. And I say, 'Hello?' And this voice says, 'Oh, uh, Patrick, it's Ricky, it's Ricky Gervais.' And I say, 'Yeah, yeah, sure, come on.' Because I've got a friend who does brilliant impersonations. And he says, 'No, no, no, no, it really is Ricky Gervais... listen, have you got a minute?' And he pitched the idea to me.

And I watch 'The Office.' I've been converted to 'The Office;' I didn't get it at first, but then I did get it. I'd heard about this series they were shooting. I saw (the script) less than 24 hours before we shot it. And every word in that scene is scripted. Nothing was improvised or made up. That's the brilliance of those two guys, Steve (Merchant) and Ricky. And it was one of the most fun mornings of my life.

Do people still come up to you and talk to you about that?

All the time. All the time. I, for a time, was seeing someone, and she called me up one day and said, "I just had a call from my father. He was on a plane and he saw you being interviewed when all you were doing was talking about seeing women's clothes fall off... (and he said) What the hell is this?" He believed it! He thought it was a real interview Now, I said, "Well, you just paid me a huge compliment. And Ricky."

(Quelle)

Sry aber das Interview mußte ich einfach komplett posten. *g* 'Oil sick'. Frechheit. Armer Armus. :tongue:

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Sooooo, gerade eben gefunden, sehr aktuell, heute morgen noch nicht dagewesen - neue Fotos von Sir Patrick in seinem neuen Theaterstück BINGO.

Man findet sie hier unter PHOTOS/PRODUCTION.

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gibt es ein Video, in dem Sir Patrick die (etwas verstörende) Geschichte erzählt, wie er damals sein Haarteil "verlor".

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Hier gibts BINGO reviews (oder besser, Links zu selbigen): Klick mich.

Hier ist ein Auszug aus einem Interview, das im TV Guide Magazine erschienen ist:

Patrick Stewart Boldly Goes Back to Shakespeare

[...]

Will you be like Olivier and downplay your title, or be like Ben Kinglsey and annoyingly insist that everyone call you Sir?

People are not aware that before I came to Hollywood I was known exclusively in the profession as Pat Stewart, so I’ve been thinking that I might like to be called Sir Pat. It has a kind of ease and familiarity about it. So we’ll see if I can encourage that. But you know, in the U.K., you are not allowed to get away with any bulls--t where this is concerned. More than half of the congratulatory emails and texts and letters I’ve received have contained jokes. Last night, I threw a celebratory dinner for all my Next Generation pals. Happily, everyone in the cast was in town at the same time. I can’t remember the last time that happened. Well, it was a glorious, very emotional evening, and even they were saying, “Do we have to call you Sir Captain now?” [Laughs]

How would your late parents have reacted to your knighthood?

My mother would have been overwhelmed. My father, who was a military man, would have been immensely proud. [His eyes get misty.] That’s the one measure of sadness about this honor—they are not here to see it happen. You know, for 15 years of my youth we lived in a house on Camm Lane that was known as a one-up, one-down—meaning one room upstairs, one downstairs, no toilet. My brothers and I slept in our parents’ bedroom with a partition between us. It’s such a long time ago. [He starts to choke up.] To think about that now so moves me. It’s a long way from Camm Lane.

(Den Rest gibts hier: QUELLE)

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Sir Patrick ist heute in Brighton (also im Sinne von jetzt gerade *g*) und macht dort Werbung für Labour. Fotos finden sich hier, hier und hier.

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